Author Topic: Broken laptop hinge  (Read 1221 times)

Scav

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Broken laptop hinge
« on: November 30, 2015, 10:56:44 AM »
Had an old customer call me with a busted hinge. It's an expensive laptop so I suggested with replacing it with an OEM lower chassis... Or the less expensive alternative of drilling and screwing. She chose the latter.

I omitted some pictures but essentially, the plastic stanchions on the lower chassis break off and the brass inserts with it. These are what hold the screen hinge in place.



I drilled through these holes, through the lower chassis. I then sent some screws up from the bottom, with a lock washer and nut on top. A bit of loctite will ensure they don't come undone. It works surprisingly well and ought to last for a very long time. As you can see from below, there's hardly anything different cosmetically.



I'm pleased with the results. Will definitely replicate this in the future.

plongeur66

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Re: Broken laptop hinge
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2015, 07:38:35 AM »
Looks workable. Beware the screw heads snagging on somebody's clothes, or scraping up wood furniture.

morpheiuz

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Re: Broken laptop hinge
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2016, 06:50:28 AM »
I just saw this one so sorry for reviving a dead topic.

That is a pretty slick work around to fix that hinge. This kind of repair reminds me of the days when I worked for an asset management company (we bought tractor trailer loads of used computer equipment from companies who had upgraded and wanted to get rid of their old equipment).

Some of my proudest jury rigging moments were using super glue to glue drive bay covers into empty drive bays where we didn't have another junk system with the exact same type of drive bay cover that I could use to fill the hole so to speak. I had to find a similar bay cover that would fit and match color wise but wouldn't snap into the front case cover, then sit down with a piece of fine grit sand paper so I could rough up the edges to help the glue bond better, then use super glue to mount the cover permanently, but in such a way that if the customer who bought it from us came back wanting to upgrade and add another optical drive, I could then use a razor knife to carefully cut through the glue to remove the bay cover.

I didn't make very much money at this job (9.50 an hour (this was around 1999-2001), but I sure enjoyed it and got a lot of perks for free computer equipment (monitors, laptops, desktop systems) that the boss would let me take home if he didn't feel that he could resell it. I used to have like 4 of those old tower compaq server systems that had either 486 or pentium pro cpu chips in them. I used them for a home lab to let me work on stuff for my MCSE classes at college, they actually ran pretty decent with windows 2000 Server.


morpheiuz

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Re: Broken laptop hinge
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2016, 07:28:06 AM »
Another low tech fix that you should get a kick out of. We used to get eye bee m th1nkp@d laptops by the pallet from one of our customers. these were late model 486 and pentium models.

There always used to be a large percentage of them that wouldn't power on or work. My boss gave me a bunch of them to play around with / take apart to see if I could figure out what was wrong with them. I took several of the really busted up ones apart and discovered that they used modular boards where there were multiple daughterboards that were snapped onto the main board.

In each of these non-working laptops the daughterboards had gotten dislogged when the laptop had been dropped. I figured out that if you used percussive maintance (smacking the plastic case onto a table or counter top or dropping the laptop bottom down into a rubber floor mat, the daughterboards would usually always reseat themselves and the laptop would start working again.

Another fix I figured out was that if the hard drive wasn't being recognized by the system on boot up, I could remove it and tap the spindle or use a shake / twist motion on it in my hand to get the hard drive spindle bearing to start spinning again. We couldn't use those in customer systems but boss man would let me take those home to use in the stuff I got to keep for myself.

Scav

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Re: Broken laptop hinge
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2016, 03:34:07 PM »
Haha. Loved those fixes. It's always nice when we get to apply some creativity to repairs.

The idea wasn't mine - I saw it on a YouTube video and modified it a bit.

Another trick I picked up online:

I was changing the skid plates on a snowblower and the nut was rusted onto the carriage bolt. There's buying to grab onto. The square portion spun a round hole in the wheel metal frame, so nothing is gripping.

I grabbed my air ratchet and a hacksaw blade and spun the bolt while jamming the blade down. In a minute or so, my makeshift lathe had popped the bead right off!

morpheiuz

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Re: Broken laptop hinge
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2016, 08:47:09 AM »
hey whatever works. I've seen mechanics take a blow torch to frozen bolt nuts too, by heating up the metal it causes it to expand so the nut can be removed.


plongeur66

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Re: Broken laptop hinge
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2016, 11:41:32 PM »
Salt/rust country here. I don't even bother putting the breaker bar on my buggy's bolt heads until after I've applied PB Blaster and heated the bolt red hot with a torch. Too much risk of twisting the head off if I don't, which makes the job a lot harder. I clean the bolt threads with a hacksaw blade and apply anti-seize compund before reassembling.